FOOD

Tasty retreat

IF you’ve eaten a buffet breakfast in NSW chances are you’ve tasted Richard Deignan’s bacon.

The fourth-generation butcher and owner of the Black Forest Smoke House on Victoria Rd supplies most of the large hotel chains in Sydney and surrounding suburbs.

“If you’ve stayed in any of the large hotels in the city you’ve woken up to our breakfast,” Mr Deignan said. “Which is lucky, during the GFC the one thing, the one constant was breakfast. It helped us to make it through.”

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Black Forest Smokehouse owner Richard Deignan with a Hand rolled double smoked Ham.Source: News Limited

While most of Mr Deignan’s business is supplying chains and wholesalers he still maintains a small shopfront on his 1000sqm factory.

The suburb is known for its produce, from the Marrickville pork roll which sees a lunchtime queue at the Hellenic Bakery and Cake store, to the organic markets on the weekend.

Every cheese and pasta producer has a shopfront with the local producers and council banding together to create a Made in Marrickville brand.

Owner and manager of the The Pasta Factory on Buckley St, Gino Farrugia, said the food community is relatively unknown in surrounding suburbs.

“You pay $30 (in other suburbs) for what you can buy here for $7,” he said.

ARTS

A thriving theatre hot spot

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Producer Jessica Burns and Monique Salle at The Factory Theatre, 105 Victoria Road, Marrickville.Source: News Limited

LIKE much of the inner west Marrickville is becoming a centre for arts with many theatres, art galleries and boutique coffee houses cropping up in the once industrial suburb.

On Faversham St the famous Red Rattler theatre continues to host everyone from musicians, artists and designers to the more ambiguous “experimentalists” and activists.

The artistic community is strong in Marrickville with more than 40 arts spaces, including the ESP Gallery on Illawarra Rd and Factory 49 on Shepherd St.

THE WARREN

Past glories

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Corinna, mum Paola and Tharen Candi walking home from school past the ruins from an old castle at The Warren.Source: News Limited

THERE is a castle in Marrickville which still has its own feudal community.

Wool merchant, politician and eccentric millionaire Thomas Holt built The Warren, a gothic mansion complete with art galleries, Turkish baths and rabbit breeding ground (hence the name) in 1864.

While Holt left Australia in 1883 and the castle was demolished in 1919 after playing host to an order of Carmelite nuns and an artillery training camp during World War I, the area, several blocks long, is still known by locals as The Warren.

“My husband grew up here,” resident Paola Candi says. “He doesn’t tell people he’s from Marrickville; he says he’s from The Warren.”

WHAT’S UP WITH THOSE METAL SCULPTURES?

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Things of interest around the suburb of Marrickville. Statues on shop awnings on Marrickville Road.Source: News Limited

The strange figures perched above the shopfronts in Marrickville are the work of Victorian artist Ces Camilleri who erected sculptures prior to the 2000 Olympics.

“It was funny because Marrickville used to have a bad name down in Melbourne,” Camilleri said. “People would say to me `oh it’s pretty rough there isn’t it’. It doesn’t seem like that anymore, it’s much more welcoming.”

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Marrickville — Secret Suburbs. Things of interest around the suburb of Marrickville. Statues on shop awnings on Marrickville Road.Source: News Limited

Mr Camilleri returns to the suburb each year to maintain the sculptures and has noticed a change.

“There’s more artwork,” he said. “And people are happier. It’s just a nice culture sort of place now.”

REVERSE GARBAGE

Trash becomes treasure

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Warehouse Manager Andrew Cutts at Reverse Garbage.Source: News Limited

A MASSIVE T-Rex head, a 2m King Kong and coffee cup jellyfish were all garbage once, but now they’re part of Australia’s largest creative reuse centre.

Located in warehouse eight at the Addison Road Community Centre Reverse Garbage was the brainchild of a collective of school teachers who, in 1974, wanted an easy way to source materials for craft collection.

About 100 football fields worth of recyclable materials per year finds their way back into reuse rather than ending up on the trash.

Here you can find a piano for $80, hundreds of store mannequins, clothing, books, DVDs and some astonishingly hip-looking furniture.

“We’ve started to do reupholstering lately,” manager Andrew Cutts said. “For example we had some old purple cinema curtains donated and an ugly old vinyl couch.”

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Here you can find a piano for $80, hundreds of store mannequins, clothing, books, DVDs and some astonishingly hip-looking furniture.

“We’ve started to do reupholstering lately,” manager Andrew Cutts said. “For example we had some old purple cinema curtains donated and an ugly old vinyl couch.”

PARKS

Solid as a brick

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

Hunter Schiller, 4, playing at Enmore Park.Source: News Limited

ONCE upon a time these were the brick pits which helped build Sydney with a single factory forging up to 300,000 bricks per week from the clay earth around Marrickville.

When the boom ended the pits became old and unused, eventually filling in with rainwater and posing a public safety hazard with drownings occurring in several of them.

The council resumed the old pits in the 20s and 30s creating many of the small public parks which populate the suburb.

Marrickville - Secret Suburbs

But the history of the area is lost on four-year-old Hunter Shiller who simply wants to get to the top of the rocket slide.

“The rocket is the best thing,” he said. “But they block it off.

“I want to get up there.”

The top levels of the slide are now blocked off to the public in much the same way as the brick pits were filled in with dirt but Hunter and mum Carolyn still enjoy the rest of the rides in the afternoon sun.

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